Brain-computer interface (BCI) evaluation in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

TitleBrain-computer interface (BCI) evaluation in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsMcCane, LM, Sellers, EW, McFarland, DJ, Mak, JN, C Carmack, S, Zeitlin, D, Wolpaw, JR, Vaughan, TM
JournalAmyotroph Lateral Scler Frontotemporal Degener
Volume15
Issue3-4
Pagination207-15
Date Published06/2014
ISSN2167-9223
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Biofeedback, Psychology, brain-computer interfaces, Communication Disorders, Electroencephalography, Event-Related Potentials, P300, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Online Systems, Photic Stimulation, Psychomotor Performance, Reaction Time
Abstract

Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) might restore communication to people severely disabled by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or other disorders. We sought to: 1) define a protocol for determining whether a person with ALS can use a visual P300-based BCI; 2) determine what proportion of this population can use the BCI; and 3) identify factors affecting BCI performance. Twenty-five individuals with ALS completed an evaluation protocol using a standard 6 × 6 matrix and parameters selected by stepwise linear discrimination. With an 8-channel EEG montage, the subjects fell into two groups in BCI accuracy (chance accuracy 3%). Seventeen averaged 92 (± 3)% (range 71-100%), which is adequate for communication (G70 group). Eight averaged 12 (± 6)% (range 0-36%), inadequate for communication (L40 subject group). Performance did not correlate with disability: 11/17 (65%) of G70 subjects were severely disabled (i.e. ALSFRS-R

URLhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24555843
DOI10.3109/21678421.2013.865750
Alternate JournalAmyotroph Lateral Scler Frontotemporal Degener
PubMed ID24555843
PubMed Central IDPMC4427912
Grant ListP41 EB018783 / EB / NIBIB NIH HHS / United States
R01 EB000856 / EB / NIBIB NIH HHS / United States
R01 HD030146 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States