Videos in the News

The following videos show several examples of NCAN staff presenting work through the media.

Media & PR Videos
Brain-Computer Interface System Setup Training Video
January 27, 2014
This video shows the Wadsworth BCI Home System, which a small number of people with late-stage amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) now use for basic communication and other purposes at home. This video is intended for the user’s caregiver to describe how to set up the system, how to place the electrode cap and work with the operating system.
ECoG video article in Journal of Visualized Experiments
June 26, 2012
This video article "Recording Human Electrocorticographic (ECoG) Signals for Neuroscientific Research and Real-time Functional Cortical Mapping" by Dr. Jeremy Hill et al. gives an overview of the principles and practice of ECoG-based research. The video prominently highlights Jeremy Hill, Peter Brunner, and Disha Gupta from our laboratory, as well as our collaborators Tony Ritaccio and Matt Adamo from Albany Medical College.
American Museum of Natural History "Listening to the Brain"
November 23, 2010
This American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan had a large exhibit entitled "Brain - The Inside Story". It included a video prominently featuring our ECoG-based studies.
CNN Edge of Discovery - Brain Readers
August 1, 2009
This episode of CNN's Edge of Discovery showcases brain-computer interface research at Wadsworth, and highlights members of our team.
CBS 60 Minutes
November 2, 2008
This feature of CBS 60 Minutes describes Wadsworth BCI, and its promise for restoring communication to people who are completely paralyzed, such as people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Scott Pelley wears an EEG cap and spells words with his brain signals using the Wadsworth home BCI system.
Two-Dimensional Control of a Robotic Arm
February 19, 2008
In this movie, a subject uses scalp-recorded sensorimotor rhythms to control a robotic arm in two dimensions (one dimension controls the thumb; the other dimension controls the other fingers). The subject’s task is to mimick hand gestures shown by a technician.
2D Movement Control Using ECoG
July 7, 2007
In this movie showing collaborative research with Dr. Leuthardt, a subject uses electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals recorded from the surface of the brain to control a computer cursor in two dimensions. The subject's task is to hit a target that appears at one of four possible locations. The subject acquired this level of control over the cursor with less than one hour of training. Real-time operation is powered by BCI2000.
1D Movement Control Using EEG
February 7, 2007
In this movie of research by Dr. Jon Wolpaw, a person with spinal cord injury uses scalp-recorded sensorimotor rhythms to control a computer cursor in one dimension. The user's task is to hit a target that appears at one of six possible locations. Real-time operation is powered by BCI2000.
2D Movement Control Using EEG
January 6, 2007
In this movie of research by Dr. Jon Wolpaw, a person with spinal cord injury uses scalp-recorded sensorimotor rhythms to control a computer cursor in two dimensions. The user's task is to hit a target that appears at one of eight possible locations. Real-time operation is powered by BCI2000.
2D Robotic Arm Control Using EEG
January 2, 2007
In this movie of research by Dr. Jon Wolpaw, a person with spinal cord injury uses scalp-recorded sensorimotor rhythms to control a robotic arm in two dimensions. The user's task is to hit a target that appears at one of eight possible locations. Real-time operation is powered by BCI2000.
Spelling using EEG and Dasher
December 1, 2006
In this movie, a subject uses scalp-recorded sensorimotor rhythms to control a computer cursor in one dimension (up/down). The subject’s task is to select characters using the word processing software “Dasher.” The subject spells the word “hello” in 30 seconds.
Four-Target Selection Using Tactile Feedback
November 15, 2006
The subject controls movement of a cursor on the screen to select one of four targets. The subject cannot see the screen, but receives feedback on the target and the current cursor position through eight vibrotactile actuators placed on his shoulders. This video was shot during a live demonstration at the
BCI Control of a Domotic Assistive System
November 15, 2006
A subject demonstrates selection of an item from an icon-based menu using a 2-state BCI that is controlled by scalp-recorded mu-rhythm modulation. In a first scene, the subject turns off the light. In a second scene, the subject unlocks the front door (the person entering the room is visible in the lower left panel of the screen, monitored by a video camera). The assistive device software controls each actuator using signals communicated using wireless or powerline communication.
Rapid Identification of Motor Cortex
October 15, 2006
Electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals are recorded from 128 locations over frontal, temporal, and motor cortices, using BCI2000 software. The subject is instructed to move the left thumb, to imagine the same action, or to rest in response to visual cues. The BCI2000 SIGFRIED module determines activity change in mu/beta frequency bands and translates that change into the diameter of a circle at each electrode location. Areas corresponding to thumb movement are rapidly identified.
BCI Control of "Space Invaders"
September 15, 2006
In this movie, a subject uses electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals recorded from the surface of the brain to control a space ship in the classic game “Space Invaders.” The subject’s task is to steer the space ship left or right so as to avoid being hit. The space ship automatically fires.
  BCI2000 on Today Show with Katie Couric
December 1, 2005
This clip is from the Today Show on NBC with Katie Couric. In this show, she uses scalp-recorded EEG to write the word “peace” with the Wadsworth P300-based BCI system.
Aibo Robot Navigation Using a Brain-Computer Interface “Joystick”
September 15, 2005
A subject uses the BCI to navigate a robotic dog along a path to its “bone.” To move the robotic dog in the two dimensions (i.e., up/down and left/right), the subject modulates two independent features of his/her sensorimotor rhythms. Obstacle avoidance integrated in the robot allows the subject to focus on the high-level navigation task only.
Playing Pong with EEG
February 15, 2005
In this movie, two subjects play the computer game “Pong” while 32 channels of scalp-recorded electroencephalo-graphic (EEG) activity are acquired from each subject. BCI2000 simultaneously processes the EEG signals from each subject, and extracts from each a control signal. These control signals are transmitted to an external application that translates them into the vertical position of the paddles.